AppSec Blog: Category - Authentication

AppSec Blog:

LinkedIn OAuth Open Redirect Disclosure

During a recent mobile security engagement, I discovered an Insecure Redirect vulnerability in the LinkedIn OAuth 1.0 implementation that could allow an attacker to conduct phishing attacks against LinkedIn members. This vulnerability could be used to compromise LinkedIn user accounts, and gather sensitive information from those accounts (e.g. personal information and credit card numbers). The following describes this security vulnerability in detail and how I discovered it.

The Vulnerability
Section 4.7 of the OAuth 1.0 specification (RFC 5849) warns of possible phishing attacks, depending on the implementation. A vulnerable OAuth implementation could enable phishing attacks via user-agent redirection. The stated emphasis, further supported by OAuth 2.0 (RFC 6749 via "redirect_uri" parameter), is intended to raise awareness of open-redirection as a security vulnerability that should be avoided.

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HTML5: Risky Business or Hidden Security Tool Chest?

I was lucky to be allowed to present about how to use HTML5 to improve security at the recent OWASP APPSEC USA Conference in New York City. OWASP now made a video of the talk available on YouTube for anybody interested.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzjpUqMwnoI

 

Ask the Expert - Johannes Ullrich

Johannes Ullrich is the Chief Research Officer for the SANS Institute, where he is responsible for the SANS Internet Storm Center (ISC) and the GIAC Gold program. Prior to working for SANS, Johannes worked as a lead support engineer for a Web development company and as a research physicist. Johannes holds a PhD in Physics from SUNY Albany and is located in Jacksonville, Florida.

1. There have been so many reports of passwords being stolen lately. What is going on? Is the password system that everyone is using broken?

Passwords are broken. A password is supposed to be a secret you share with a site to authenticate yourself. In order for this to work, the secret may only be known to you and that particular site. This is no longer true if you use the same password with more than one site. Also, the password has to be hard to guess but easy to remember. It is virtually impossible to come up with numerous hard to guess but easy to remember

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Password Tracking in Malicious iOS Apps

In this article, John Bielich and Khash Kiani introduce OAuth, and demonstrate one type of approach in which a malicious native client application can compromise sensitive end-user data.

Earlier this year, Khash posted a paper entitled: "Four Attacks on OAuth — How to Secure Your OAuth Implementation" that introduced a common protocol flow, with specific examples and a few insecure implementations. For more information about the protocol, various use cases and key concepts, please refer to the mentioned post and any other freely available OAuth resources on the web.

This article assumes that the readers are familiar with the detailed principles behind OAuth, and that they know how to make GET and POST requests over HTTPS. However, we will still

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Four Attacks on OAuth - How to Secure Your OAuth Implementation

This article briefly introduces an emerging open-protocol technology, OAuth, and presents scenarios and examples of how insecure implementations of OAuth can be abused maliciously. We examine the characteristics of some of these attack vectors, and discuss ideas on countermeasures against possible attacks on users or applications that have implemented this protocol.

An Introduction to the Protocol


OAuth is an emerging authorization standard that is being adopted by a growing number of sites such as Twitter, Facebook, Google, Yahoo!, Netflix, Flickr, and several other Resource Providers and social networking sites. It is an open-web specification for organizations to access protected resources on each other's web sites. This is achieved by allowing users to grant a third-party application access to their protected content without having to provide that application with their credentials.

Unlike Open ID, which is a federated

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