AppSec Blog: Category - defense

AppSec Blog:

HTML5: Risky Business or Hidden Security Tool Chest?

I was lucky to be allowed to present about how to use HTML5 to improve security at the recent OWASP APPSEC USA Conference in New York City. OWASP now made a video of the talk available on YouTube for anybody interested.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzjpUqMwnoI

 

The Security Impact of HTTP Caching Headers

[This is a cross post from https://isc.sans.edu ]

Earlier this week, an update for Media-Wiki fixed a bug in how it used caching headers [2]. The headers allowed authenticated content to be cached, which may lead to sessions being shared between users using the same proxy server. I think this is a good reason to talk a bit about caching in web applications and why it is important for security.

First off all: If your application is https only, this may not apply to you. The browser does not typically cache HTTPS content, and proxies will not inspect it. However, HTTPS inspecting proxies are available and common in some corporate environment so this *may* apply to them, even though I hope they do not cache HTTPS content.

It is the goal of properly configured caching headers to avoid having personalized information stored in proxies. The server needs to include appropriate headers to indicate if the

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WhatWorks in AppSec: Log Forging

Help!!! Developers are going blind from Log Files!


This is a post by Sri Mallur, an instructor with the SANS Institute for SANS DEV541: Secure Coding in Java EE: Developing Defensible Applications.Sri is a security consultant at a major healthcare provider who has over 15 years of experience in software development and information security. He has designed and developed applications for large companies in the insurance, chemical, and healthcare industries. He has extensive consulting experience from working with one of the big 5. Sri currently focuses on security in SDLC by working with developers, performing security code reviews and consulting on projects. Sri holds a Masters in industrial engineering from Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX and an ...

Ask the Expert - Jim Manico

Jim Manico is the VP of Security Architecture for WhiteHat Security, a web security firm. Jim is a participant and project manager of the OWASP Developer Cheatsheet series. He is also the producer and host of the OWASP Podcast Series.

1. Although SQL Injection continues to be one of the most commonly exploited security vulnerabilities in the wild, Cross Site Scripting (XSS) is still the most common security problem in web applications. Why is this still the case? What makes XSS so difficult for developers to understand and to protect themselves from?

Mitigation of SQL Injection, from a developer point of view, is very straight forward. Parameterize your queries and bind your variables!

Unfortunately,

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How much do developers care about security?

3%

That's about how much developers care about security.

Starting last year I made a concerted effort to speak at developer conferences. The idea was to go directly to people who write actual code and help spread the word about application security. By speaking at technical conferences that appeal to top developers the goal was to reach out to people who really care about development and want to learn and apply everything they can. By getting these developers interested in security my hope was that they would, in some small way, lead by example since many of them are the ones that build the tools and frameworks that other developers rely upon.

It started last year at

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