AppSec Blog: Category - java

AppSec Blog:

WhatWorks in AppSec: Log Forging

Help!!! Developers are going blind from Log Files!


This is a post by Sri Mallur, an instructor with the SANS Institute for SANS DEV541: Secure Coding in Java EE: Developing Defensible Applications.Sri is a security consultant at a major healthcare provider who has over 15 years of experience in software development and information security. He has designed and developed applications for large companies in the insurance, chemical, and healthcare industries. He has extensive consulting experience from working with one of the big 5. Sri currently focuses on security in SDLC by working with developers, performing security code reviews and consulting on projects. Sri holds a Masters in industrial engineering from Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX and an ...

How much do developers care about security?

3%

That's about how much developers care about security.

Starting last year I made a concerted effort to speak at developer conferences. The idea was to go directly to people who write actual code and help spread the word about application security. By speaking at technical conferences that appeal to top developers the goal was to reach out to people who really care about development and want to learn and apply everything they can. By getting these developers interested in security my hope was that they would, in some small way, lead by example since many of them are the ones that build the tools and frameworks that other developers rely upon.

It started last year at

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Real and useful security help for software developers

There's lots of advice on designing and building secure software. All you need to do is: Think like an attacker. Minimize the Attack Surface. Apply the principles of Least Privilege and Defense in Depth and Economy of Mechanism. Canonicalize and validate all input. Encode and escape output within the correct context. Use encryption properly. Manage sessions in a secure way.
But how are development teams actually supposed to do all of this? How do they know what's important, and what's not? What frameworks and libraries should they use? Where are code samples that they can review and follow? How can they test the software to see if they did everything correctly?

There aren't as many resources to help developers answer these questions. Here are the best that I have found so far.

Cheat Sheets

First, there are the OWASP Prevention Cheat Sheets, which provide clear, practical advice

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Safer Software through Secure Frameworks

We have to make it easier for developers to build secure apps, especially Web apps. We can't keep forcing everybody who builds an application to understand and plug all of the stupid holes in how the Web works on their own — and to do this perfectly right every time. It's not just wasteful: it's not possible.

What we need is implementation-level security issues taken care of at the language and framework level. So that developers can focus on their real jobs: solving design problems and writing code that works.

Security Frameworks and Libraries

One option is to get developers to use secure libraries that take care of application security functions like authentication, authorization, data validation and encryption. There are some good, and free, tools out there to help you.

If you're a Microsoft .NET developer, there's Microsoft's Web Protection Library which provides functions and a runtime engine

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Checklists, software and software security

There are practical applications of checklists in many different fields. Aviation, project engineering, now even surgery. But what about software? Sure, checklists are sometimes used in code reviews, to good effect. But can we do more, can we get the same thing out of checklists that pilots do, or that surgeons do?