AppSec Blog

AppSec Blog

Security Testing: Less, but More Often can make a Big Difference

Late last year SANS conducted a survey on application security practices in enterprises. One of the questions asked in the survey was how often organizations are doing security testing. The responses were:


  • No security testing policy for critical apps: 13.5%

  • Only when applications are updated, patched or changed: 21.3%

  • Annually: 14.3%

  • Every 3 months: 18.0%

  • Once a month: 9.5%

  • Ongoing: 23.3%


What was most interesting to me is that almost of organizations are doing security testing on an ongoing, near-continuous basis — testing applications as they are being developed or changed.

The only way to test this frequently, and the effective way to scale security testing in large enterprises with thousands of applications and hundreds of web sites, is by relying heavily on

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Ask the Expert - Jim Manico

Jim Manico is the VP of Security Architecture for WhiteHat Security, a web security firm. Jim is a participant and project manager of the OWASP Developer Cheatsheet series. He is also the producer and host of the OWASP Podcast Series.

1. Although SQL Injection continues to be one of the most commonly exploited security vulnerabilities in the wild, Cross Site Scripting (XSS) is still the most common security problem in web applications. Why is this still the case? What makes XSS so difficult for developers to understand and to protect themselves from?

Mitigation of SQL Injection, from a developer point of view, is very straight forward. Parameterize your queries and bind your variables!

Unfortunately,

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Ask the Expert - Dan Cornell

Dan Cornell has over fifteen years of experience architecting and developing web-based software systems. As CTO and Principal, he leads Denim Group's security research team in investigating the application of secure coding and development techniques to improve web-based software development methodologies. Dan was the founding coordinator and chairman for the Java Users Group of San Antonio (JUGSA) and currently serves as the OWASP San Antonio chapter leader, member of the OWASP Global Membership Committee and co-lead of the OWASP Open Review Project. Dan has spoken at such international conferences as RSA, OWASP AppSec USA, and OWASP EU Research in Greece.

The cost of fixing software bugs has been studied for a long time now, with experts like Capers Jones collecting data from development and maintenance projects around the world. But up until recently there has been very little data available on the cost of remediating security vulnerabilities. Denim Group is one

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SANS Appsec Survey

SANS has just opened a survey to understand more about the challenges and risks that companies are facing in application security, and what tools and practices people have found are most effective in managing appsec problems.

Please follow this link and take 5-10 minutes to answer the survey questions:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/56TKYX7

Help shape the future of application security practices and technologies and also enter to win a $300 American Express gift card, which will be awarded to one lucky winner!

Sponsored by NT OBJECTives, Qualys, Whitehat Security and Veracode, this survey will remain online until November 7, 2012. Results will be published at http://www.sans.org/info/113477 on December 13, 2012, during a related

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Ask the Expert - Johannes Ullrich

Johannes Ullrich is the Chief Research Officer for the SANS Institute, where he is responsible for the SANS Internet Storm Center (ISC) and the GIAC Gold program. Prior to working for SANS, Johannes worked as a lead support engineer for a Web development company and as a research physicist. Johannes holds a PhD in Physics from SUNY Albany and is located in Jacksonville, Florida.

1. There have been so many reports of passwords being stolen lately. What is going on? Is the password system that everyone is using broken?

Passwords are broken. A password is supposed to be a secret you share with a site to authenticate yourself. In order for this to work, the secret may only be known to you and that particular site. This is no longer true if you use the same password with more than one site. Also, the password has to be hard to guess but easy to remember. It is virtually impossible to come up with numerous hard to guess but easy to remember

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